DDD Conference

Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

Convener: Arnon Karnieli, BGU

The primary uses of remote sensing in ecology are to provide land-cover and land-use information, quantify biophysical variables linked with ecological processes and biodiversity, and characterize biodiversity directly. All of which can be (and are) performed in the temporal dimension. This session aims to present state-of-the-art research on the matter in order to stimulate further discussion on the potential of remote sensing in the dryland ecological framework.

Showing all 6 results

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Dr. Amir Lewin

    Assessing Global Dryland System Designations: Land-Uses, Conservation Status and Congruency of Global Arid Landscapes

    Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Dr. Angela Lausch

    Ecosystem Integrity – Sensor /EO-Service (ESIS) for Monitoring Bio- and Geodiversity, Vegetation Health and Land-Use Intensity by Spectral Traits, Remote Sensing

    Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Dr. Garik Gutman

    A View from Space of Drylands Agriculture Over the World

    NASA Headquarters, USA

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Dr. Nimrod Carmon

    Mapping Wildfire Risk with Orbital Imaging Spectroscopy: A Unified Spectral Unmixing and Atmospheric Correction Approach

    NASA & California Institute of Technology, USA

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Prof. Ariel Meroz

    Untangling the Human and Climatic Impacts on Vhanges in Vegetation Using Large Scale Exclosures: National Borders and Military Areas

    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

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    Remote Sensing Applications for Drylands Ecology

    Prof. Geoffrey Henebry

    Observing Arid and Semi-Arid Grasslands at Multiple Spatio-temporal Scales: What Land Surface Phenologies Can Reveal About Ecosystem Dynamics

    Michigan State University, USA

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